Winooski Man’s Home is Threatened by F35s

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Drew Burns has lived in Vermont 12 years and he lives in Winooski. Burns, 33, is married and has one kid, 2 and a half. He works as an interventionist in a group home for kids. He also has a tee shirt business and a bubble soccer business at playbubblesoccer.com. His tee shirt business is called Pineale. He has been selling Bernie Sanders tee shirts well lately. He loves living in Vermont.

When asked if the community of Winooski is strong Burns said, “I think it is. I think it’s getting stronger. I think there’s a lot of really good young leadership in the town. I’m excited to see where it goes.”

To make the community stronger Burns said, “Well I think that the F35 poses a really big threat to Winooski. There is a line going through a big part of the town that the people on the wrong side of it are gonna have their home values disappear when the houses may be declared uninhabitable [because of the vibrations from the planes] which is kind of scary for me because that line has shifted a little bit, and we’re right on the edge of it. We’ve only owned our home there for three years and we have a two year old son and we’d like for him to be able to grow up there but if we can’t keep equity on our home we’re gonna have to leave.”

“I think that the local media was really slow to get involved in a reasonable way in the cannabis debate that’s going on right now. I think that showing the reality of the impact that it’s had in Colorado has been underreported. There’s so many fact finding trips and wait and see reports that our legislators have been resting on for the past two years. I just got back from Denver last week and there’s so many misconceptions about it going out there you hear that there’s weed shops on every corner and nothing’s getting done and nothing could be further from the truth. Denver is attracting young people. It’s flush with creative capital and real life capital and it was just so bustling I was really surprised to see that. I think it could do the same for our community.” Burns favors legalizing weed in Vermont.

“Obviously Bernie Sanders is a big leader here. As far as the Chittenden county area, which is all I can really speak to, definitely the people at the Community and Economic Development office. Their work here in the last 25 years has totally changed the face of this town. People involved in fair housing, micro business development things are really support the people who need it the most here and in an inclusive way where they can build their own lives and their own dreams and I think that is really special.”

When asked who he was going to vote for for the next Vermont governor Burns said, “I like a lot of the tone of what the Shumlin administration has brought to the state, but it’s hard to say this far out. I’m open to all candidates right now.”

When asked if kids should be challenged more seriously earlier in life, Burns said, “I think it depends on the type of challenge too. A lot of the ways that children are being challenged now are ways that are completely new in human history. As technology outpaces humans as far as the speed of its growth and the dynamics of what’s involved in that. Where we’re seeing newer problems that weren’t a thing, like online bullying. Never a thing before. Fat shaming is a new thing. The dynamics of social media in general where people feel pressured to live their lives from the outside in. I feel really lucky that I didn’t have to deal with that when I was growing up. I don’t even know how to support kids going through that.”

When asked if human instincts were as complex as animal instincts Burns said, “Absolutely. I think that we are out of touch with [instincts]. I don’t think that we trust them or use them or rely on them as much as we once did. There’s anecdotal stories of before electricity and street lights changed the way we saw the atmosphere. Native Americans could see stars in the daytime just because they were so much more sensitive to it. So I think we possess it. And I think we’re growing new complexities that we don’t quite know how to use yet, but we’re just as much a part of nature nad as beautiful as everything else.”

When asked if emotions are instincts Burns said, “I think they can be, but I think people mistake their emotions for truth a lot of the time and I think that the brain has an autopilot in it that we confuse for our critical thinking and that can get kind of messy.”

For hobbies and recreation Burns said he hikes, kayaks, plays with his son and creates art.

 

 

 

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