Wallingford Lady says Everybody in Her Community Helps Everybody Else Out

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Jessica Forrest, 42, has lived in Vermont her whole life. She lives in Wallingford.

When asked if her community is strong, Forrest said, “It’s a small tight knit community where everybody helps everybody else out.”

When asked if she likes living in Vermont, Forrest said, “Yes, very much.”

Forrest is married and has five children: 22, 17, 15, 11 and 8.

When asked if there was anything the media isn’t covering, Forrest said, “Unemployment in this area seems to be pretty high and the homelessness. I know they report on it but I think it’s pretty bad in Rutland.”

When asked if the average five year move rate and the practice of high school students leaving for college had the effect of ripping communities apart, Forrest said, “No, I don’t. ‘Cause I think that home is always home and so if they can go out and get experiences and knowledge and bring it back to where they came from I don’t think that would be ripping it apart.”

When asked who she sees as leaders in Vermont, Forrest said, “I think Shumlin has done a great job. Of course Bernie Sanders has always been a leader. The Weinberg’s…”

When asked if she believes every student should be taught how to grow food in a hands on environment, Forrest said, “Yes, definitely, because it’s something that they can use in adulthood. It’s something I think everyone should learn how to do to be self sufficient.”

When asked if she believes that human instincts are as complex as other animals, Forrest said, “Yes. I think so.”

When asked if she believes that emotions are instincts, Forrest said, “No. Nope. I don’t think so. I think emotions are something that we create ourselves out of our own intellect. So I think emotion comes from intellect which I don’t see any other animals having.”

Forrest would support legislation that would make it illegal to charge women more than men for similar goods and services. “I would support legislation on that aspect, yeah, because it’s discrimination.”

Forrest would not support legislation that would raise the age one could buy cigarettes in Vermont by one year each year until there was no one old enough to buy cigarettes anymore.

Forrest does not know who she is going to Vote for for the next governor of Vermont.

When asked who her favorite Vermont band is, Forrest said, “Gosh, I don’t even know if they’re still together, but it was Voodoo Alien Blues band.”

When asked if courting rituals are dead or if they are still alive and healthy, Forrest said, “I think they’re alive and healthy, but they’re different; way different than they used to be.”

Forrest is on Facebook but she rarely uses it. So don’t try to network with her.

“I think more to be…hmmm…instincts wow. That’s a hard one. Personally it’s to be good, but I can, God um. That’s a hard question. I don’t know that I can answer that.”

Forrest does support legalizing pot in Vermont.

For hobbies and recreation Forrest said she likes music, likes to hike, likes gaming and cooking.

Forrest said when asked if we focus too much on the economy and not enough on basically surviving together, “Probably.”

Forrest’s advice to youngsters is, “Keep your head up. These are tough times. I wouldn’t want to be a youngster today. It’s so much different. And I would say keep your family close.”

When asked what is the most pressing issue for her right now, Forrest said, “Global warming, yeah, I think ISIS is probably right up there with it, terrorism. Both of them are equally dangerous at this point.” Forrest would support a carbon tax.

Forrest does not believe that most Americans make a livable wage.

When asked if Vermont has any hidden gems, Forrest said, “Yes, but I couldn’t possibly name them all right now. But, yes, I think Vermont has many many hidden gems. I think if people came here for vacation and they had a tour book of all the different things they could go to it would take them months to go to them all.”

Rutland Native Says Clem’s Italian Soda is a Hidden Gem in Vermont

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Jessica Harrington, 21, has lived in Vermont her whole life. She lives in Rutland.

When asked if she thinks the community of Rutland is strong, Harrington said, “I think it could use a little work. I would say the drugs. Cause where I live, it’s still a big thing.”

When asked what could be done to make the community stronger, Harrington said, “I would have to let that go to the police. They would have to figure out what to do to get rid of the drugs in the town.”

For work, Harrington said, “I’m actually trying to get into a program with Precise. It’s a medical company.”

Harrington does like living in Vermont. “I do,” she said. “Besides the snow which we didn’t get a lot of this year, so I’m good.”

When asked if the average move rate of five years and the practice of high school students moving away for college had the effect of ripping communities apart, Harrington said, “I think with Vermont it has a tendency to make the state a little older because a lot of the college age students like to go out of state.”

When asked who she saw as leaders in Vermont, Harrington said, “Bernie Sanders. He’s the one I’ve been following. I’ve actually met Senator Leahy once. He was alright. I didn’t really talk to him much.”

When asked if she believed that elementary students should learn how to grow their own food in a hands-on environment, Harrington said, “Yes. So they know how to grow their own food. So that way they can learn that early on so they would know it for later.”

Harrington doesn’t know if human instincts are as complex as other animals, but she does believe that emotions are instincts.

When asked if instincts should be taught in school and students should be taught to follow their good instincts, Harrington said, “I think they should not make it the base of teaching but do it in class, sure.”

Harrington would support Vermont legislation that would make it illegal to charge women more than men for similar goods and services.

She would also support legislation that would raise the age one could buy cigarettes by one year each year until there were no one else old enough to buy cigarettes in Vermont.

When asked who her favorite Vermont band was, Harrington said, “There was one called midnight something. I saw them a while ago.”

When asked if courting rituals are dead or if they are still alive, Harrington said, “I think that technology sort of takes a lot of personality out of it, but I think we haven’t lost them that much.”

Harrington is on Facebook and she is interested in networking with fellow Vermonters.

When asked if our instincts are to be more selfish or more good, Harrington said, “I have to say it depends on the person. Cause some people can be more selfish than others.”

Harrington does support legalizing pot in Vermont.

For hobbies and recreation Harrington says she does “a lot of boring things. I actually like Netflix.”

When asked who her state representative is, Harrington said, “I’ve met her once. I don’t remember her name besides Peggy.”

When asked if Vermonters focus too much on the economy and not enough on basically surviving together, Harrington said, “Yes and no. Because the economy is sort of what helps, though it’s a crappy economy right now, and surviving together would also be a good thing to do.”

Harrington’s advice to youngsters is, “Stay in school, don’t smoke, don’t do drugs.”

When asked what the most pressing issue of our time is, Harrington said, “I would have to say minimum wage. Because a lot of people have trouble living off just 9.70 an hour. I had that and it’s not that good especially if you’re a single parent.”

Harrington has a four year old.

Harrington does believe that climate change is a serious threat but she is divided about whether or not she supports a carbon tax. “Yes and no. Taxes on that would be very helpful. Maybe it would help us actually do clean energy, but at the same time, that’s more money out of taxpayer’s pockets especially people who can’t afford that money being taken out of their pocket.”

Harrington does not believe most Vermonters make a livable wage. “A lot of people in Vermont, I know quite a few, they work two jobs maybe even three and they still need food stamps.”

When asked if there were any hidden gems in Vermont, Harrington said, “Well I like Clem’s. Especially their Italian sodas. Try the cherry blossom.”

“I believe there is a higher power. I don’t believe there’s just one.”

Harrington’s favorite restaurant is 99.

When asked what can be done to stop sexual predators, Harrington said, “Being less forgiving and being more cruel. Not a year or two years, but a long time. Scaring a child should not only give you two years in jail.”

Harrington does believe that welfare recipients should be drug tested and offered treatment if they test positive.

Rutland Native Praises Law Enforcement in Area

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John Hadeka, 71, was born in Rutland Vermont.

When asked if he thinks the community of Rutland is strong, Hadeka said, “I think Rutland’s got more money than you know who. You look at all these mansions around here.”

When asked what could be done to make the community stronger, Hadeka said, “I think the law enforcement is awesome. They’ve attacked the drugs coming in on trains. They’ve stopped the opium coming in on trucks. I’ve tipped them off as much as I can. You used to have to write a letter in the middle of the night. Now you just go down and state your business down there and they either agree or disagree.”

When asked if he likes living in Vermont, Hadeka said, “Yeah, it’s good to be home. I’ve got roots here.”

Hadeka has two kids, 41 and 42.

When asked if the average move rate of once every five years and the practice of moving away from home for college had the effect of ripping communities apart, Hadeka said, “No I think it’s good. I went to Myrtle Beach 25 years ago stayed 11 years, went to Indiana four years. I’ve been back here 8 years. I’m glad I saw the world.”

When asked if elementary students in rural areas should learn how to grow food in a hands on environment Hadeka said, “Sure. They start preschool down here and start computers at 4 or 5 years old. I took botany at UVM I never forget the first day the professor wrote this is a root this is a shoot he drew a line.”

When asked if he thought human instincts are as complex as other animals, Hadeka said, “I think our instincts are probably the most powerful on earth. One of self preservation, no matter what you’re doing: fighting a war or arguing with your wife.”

When asked if emotions are instincts, Hadeka said, “Yeah, when you cry you let it all out. Get rid of it.”

When asked if he thought students should be taught about their instincts and taught to follow their good instincts, Hadeka said, “Absolutely.”

When asked if he supported legislation in Vermont that would make it illegal to charge women more than men for similar goods and services, Hadeka said, “Women are still making less for the same service and Bernie’s going to have a $15 an hour entry level minimum wage.”

When asked if he supported Vermont legislation that would raise the age you could buy cigarettes one year each year until there was no longer anyone old enough to buy cigarettes in Vermont, Hadeka said, “I think 21 is a good age. What is it now? 18? Yeah 18 if you can go in the army…they let you drink a little at the PX at 18 too. Military makes its own rules.”

When asked who he would vote for for the next Governor of Vermont Hadeka said, “It’ll be Democrat I’m for the working person.”

When asked if he lamented that courting rituals were dead or if they were still alive and healthy, Hadeka said, “Back in the old days you bundled  before marriage. You just put on all your winter clothes and your father opened the door. When I was in high school if you got somebody pregnant that means you got married. Shotgun wedding. I went out with a lot of them but I didn’t want to marry any of them. I was 24 when I got married. Yeah, I think courting is unbelievable important.”

When asked if our instincts were more to be selfish or good, Hadeka said, “I hate to be selfish. That’s a no, no. It’s got to be more to the good.”

For hobbies and recreation, Hadeka said, “Play the piano, walk my dog.”

Rutland Lady Says You Never Know You May Have to Fend For Yourself Someday

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Annette Rider, 47, has lived in Vermont all her life. She lives in Rutland.

Rider does like Rutland but it has its problems according to her. “There’s a lot of drugs here.”

When asked what could be done to make the city of Rutland stronger, Rider said, “Get the drugs out of here.”

When asked how Rutland could get rid of the drugs, Rider said, “More drug awareness. More treatment. Instead of putting people in jail, offer them treatment. Jail’s not always the place to be putting drug addicts.”

Rider does like living in Vermont.

When asked who she saw as leaders in Vermont Rider cited Bernie Sanders.

Rider does believe elementary school students should learn how to grow food in a hands on environment. “Cause you never know. I mean you might have to fend for yourself some day.”

When asked if she thought human instincts are as complex as other animals, Rider said yes. She does believe that emotions are instincts.

Rider does support legislation that would make it illegal to charge women more than men for similar goods and services. “I don’t think it’s right that we’re paying more.”

Rider does not support raising the age you can buy cigarettes by one year each year until there is no longer anybody old enough to buy cigarettes in Vermont. “That’s taking away our rights.”

When asked who her favorite Vermont band is, Rider said, “I don’t know. Well you know back in the day it was 8084. They rocked.”

When asked if she laments that courting rituals are dead or if they are still alive and healthy Rider said, “There’s no such thing anymore. It’s all gone. Some guys will come to your door and open up your car door, but it’s not like it used to be.”

Rider is on Facebook and she is interested in networking with fellow Vermonters.

When asked if our instincts are more to be selfish people or good people, Rider said, “It depends on the person. Me, myself, I feel that I am a good person. It depends on the person really, how they were brought up.”

Rider does believe that pot should be legalized in Vermont.

When asked what she does for hobbies and recreation Rider said, “Well me, I’m in recovery, so I do a lot of recovery.”

Rider does believe we focus too much on the economy and not enough on basically surviving together.

Rider’s advice to youngsters is, “Don’t do drugs.”

Rider believes the most pressing issue of our time is drugs. “There’s a lot of drugs out here that are killing everybody.”

Rider does believe that climate change is a serious threat and she would support a carbon tax to push Vermont away from dirty fuels.

Rider does not believe that most Americans make a livable wage. “It’s hard to live on one income.”

Her favorite restaurant is 99.

Rider likes organic foods. “My daughter is very organic so she tries to get me to eat healthy.”

When asked what can be done to keep children safe from sexual predators Rider said, “Keep them in jail.”

She does support drug testing welfare recipients and getting them into treatment if they test positive.

Rutland Teacher Praises Mayor and Young Professionals as Leaders

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Matt Seager, 32, was born and raised in Vermont. He lives in Rutland, and he is a teacher.

When asked if he thinks the community of Rutland is strong, Seager said, “I feel that  it’s got a bad rap with the drugs and with crime. There’s a report that came out that had Rutland as the most dangerous place in Vermont, which I can tell you is just, I don’t believe it at all. You know I think that there aren’t many cities in Vermont so Rutland…it has it’s share of problems, but you look at the population, you look at the city…it’s really a pretty good place.”

When asked what could be done to make Rutland stronger, Seager said, “I really don’t know. I’ve seen a lot of good things going on with the young professionals, some of my friends are involved with that. I think there’s a lot of good efforts involved a lot of awareness and you’re kind of seeing some of these things play out that are happening not only in New England but you know I lived in the Midwest not too long ago and the same thing’s happening out there but it’s sort of that bucolic type image of Vermont that’s attracting attention. I think there’s a lot of good things going on. Pine Hill Park has a lot of good stuff going. I think for a place this size there’s a lot going on in a positive way.”

When asked if he likes living in Vermont, Seager said yes. “For anyone that enjoys four seasons, it’s got a lot to offer. You gotta find something to do during the winter, but generally speaking I mean and you know I’ve lived overseas and whatnot, I really think Vermont’s a great place, I used to say a great place to be from, but now as I come back a little older you know you appreciate it more and more when you do come back just the scenery and the people.”

When asked if there is anything the media isn’t covering that should be covered, Seager said, “I could offer more about what I think shouldn’t be covered or sensationalized. I think that you know a lot of that sensationalization is attracting negative attention. What I think you’re seeing with the police there’s a lot more awareness that way. I think that Vermont is a very progressive place and I think that’s a good thing. I think more focus on that. And there has been some about different treatment options that are going on here and sometimes it gets spun into a negative type thing when actually it’s a pretty positive thing. A lot of other places around the country are keeping an eye on Vermont to see how these things play out. And to spin that in a positive way is an option for the media. I think that would be a good thing. I think a lot of the problems are not necessarily Vermont problems but they’ve been spun that way. You know there’s a big out of state element that has come through that’s a big part of the problem and I think that a alot of the focus has just been on the local addiction issue which you know is a part of the problem but certainly not the entire thing.”

When asked if the average five year move rate and the practice of high school students leaving home for college has the effect of ripping communities apart, Seager said, “No not at all. I’m a pretty good example of that really. I left home at 16 and went to boarding school in Connecticut. I went to Spain for a couple years after that. I’ve lived down south, I’ve lived in the Midwest and I’m back. I think it actually gives the people who do leave and come back a deeper appreciation for where they grew up and where they’re from. It can be a little limiting; you get that with any small town environment, but it’s great to have people come back with new ideas and new experiences and all that comes with moving away.”

When asked who he saw as leaders in Vermont Seager said, “You know I’m really not as up as I should be on the politics in Vermont. I think the mayor Chris Lauras has done a very good job. I consider him a leader. I consider some of the local young professionals around here leaders. In particular Kate Richards and Jim Sabataso, Matt Bloomer…those people are all, you know they lead by example and they dedicate their time and their talents to helping the local community and especially the young people to find their way.

When asked if he thought elementary school students should learn how to grow food in a hands-on environment, Seager said, “No not necessarily. I think it’s nice. I think that, you know I tutor some local kids with some remedial math and English. I think that those extra programs are certainly good and useful. I’m not sure if the elementary school level is the time to be introducing that, but I like the idea of new programs and progressive ideas like that.”

When asked if he thought human instincts are as complex as other animals, Seager said, “I believe that they are more complex.”

When asked if he thought emotions are instincts, Seager said, “I think that they influence our instincts.”

When asked if he supports legislation that would make it illegal to charge women more than men for the same goods and services, Seager said, “Yes I absolutely do.”

When asked if he would support legislation that would raise the age you could buy cigarettes by one year each year until there was no longer anyone who was old enough to buy cigarettes in Vermont, Seager said, “No I would not.”

When asked if he believes courting rituals are dead or if they are still alive and healthy, Seager said, “I believe that they are still alive and healthy.”

Seager is on Facebook, but he’s not interested in networking with fellow Vermonters.

When asked if he thinks our instincts are more to be selfish or good, Seager said, “To be good people”

Seager does support legalizing pot in Vermont.

When asked what he does for hobbies and recreation, Seager said, “I travel. I do a lot of back-packing. I play sports. I play golf and hockey and skiing.”

When asked if he thinks we focus too much on the economy and not enough on basically surviving together, Seager said, “No I think that’s an important piece to survival certainly. I think you have to address some of these things at the government level the administrative level to sort some of that stuff out. I see the distinction, but I think that they go hand in hand.”

Bennington Man Charged With Sexual Assault of a Child Should Get Life in Prison

A Bennington man was charged with sexual assault of a girl from the time she was five until she was a teenager. Just another of the grotesque misdeeds from a Vermont man who broke the public’s trust and turned his sexual addictions on a helpless victim. The man, Warren Lake, 59, should spend the rest of his life behind bars.

Vermont should pass a law that would require a 30 year minimum sentence for adults who engage in sexual conduct with underage victims. In interviews that the Vermont Gossip has conducted there is support for a move like this. These sick puppies often get out after just a couple years behind bars and re-offend.

In the good old days authorities would have just hanged offenders in the public for all the people of the town to see. It’s unfortunate that we’ve lost our appetite for death sentences. With over population out of control and prisoners wasting tax payer money, we should find the heart to hang, a much cheaper method of execution, people who commit the most heinous crimes.

However, since there is no appetite for execution in Vermont child sex offenders should get a minimum of 30 years behind bars for their misdeeds.

Rutland Lady Says Community Helps Out Even if Just in Little Ways

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Michelle Benoit, 38, was born in Vermont. She grew up here and moved to Massachusetts when she was 18 to be with her dad and she came back to Vermont when she was 23. She lives in Rutland.

When asked if her community was strong Benoit said, “Yeah. People help each other support each other even working. Sometimes when you need help you go to people and they usually find a way to help you. I mean not everyone can actually do everything, but at least something even very little it does help.”

When asked what could be done to improve the community Benoit said, “Food stamps. I have four kids and $135 food stamps just don’t cut it. Other than that, struggling.”

For work Benoit makes tiles at a factory. She likes living in Vermont. Her children are 18, 15, 14 and 12.

When asked if the average move rate of five years for Americans and the practice of leaving home for college has the effect of ripping communities apart, Benoit said, “I think it’s hard for the parents not to be able to be there when they need help or transportation because if they go out of town or any further it makes it more difficult. I mean I got my daughter who goes to upward bound up in Castleton and it’s not bad, but I imagine further than that it would be difficult.”

Benoit doesn’t know who she sees as leaders in Vermont.

When asked if elementary school students should learn how to grow food in a hands on environment, Benoit said, “In my opinion, because you never know how the world’s going to be in the future, I think think it is the best thing. Because I’ve been growing things for my grandmother just in order to survive. I mean you never know what’s going to happen in the future. Sometimes it’s best to know how to plant things or learn to survive when you have no choice.”

She does believe schools should teach students about their good and selfish instincts and teach students to follow their good instincts.

Benoit does support legislation that would make it illegal to charge women more for goods and services than men. “I think people buy things that they don’t really need, but me I only buy things that I need.”

When asked if she supported raising the age you could buy cigarettes each year by one year until no one was any longer old enough to buy cigarettes in Vermont Benoit said, “Uh, you’re talking to a woman who smokes cigarettes.” She laughed. “My kids… I wouldn’t let them smoke until their 18 because that’s the law, but I prefer they don’t. I’m hoping.”

When asked who her favorite Vermont band was, Benoit said, “I like Friday Night Live in the summer. They’re pretty good bands.”

When asked if courting rituals were still alive and healthy or if they were dead, Benoit said, “I think we’ve lost them. Cause I’m with my fiancee and he’s never honest with me.”

Benoit is on Facebook and she is interested in networking with fellow Vermonters to make Vermont the most networked state in the nation.

For hobbies and recreation Benoit said, “Scrapbooking. I always fear that when you get older you’ll forget the memory of your kids and your family so I make scrapbooks so it keeps you remembering.”

Northeast Kingdom Cat Burglar Sounds Mentally Ill

Vermont state police arrested a Troy Vermont man who stole a cat from a family in the Northeast Kingdom. Mark Frady, 54, is accused of burglary and unlawful trespass.

Frady returned to the house and was caught watching television, smoking a cigarette and drinking coffee. The bizarre story made news for a couple of days while police investigated.

Frady sounds relatively harmless, but possibly mentally ill.

Mental illness is an on going problem in Vermont where beds for the mentally ill are limited and people end up waiting in emergency rooms or prisons for treatment.

Rutland Lady Moved Back to Vermont for Family Support System

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Stephanie VanGuilder, 25, has lived in Vermont on and off for 7 years. She lives in Rutland. She is a licensed nursing assistant.

When asked if the community of Rutland is strong, VanGuilder said, “Certain parts of Rutland, yes. Other parts of Rutland, not so much.”

When asked what could be done to make the community stronger, VanGuilder said, “Get rid of the drugs for one. That’s a big thing, especially where I live. There are really good sections of Rutland. I’ve lived in them but I think drugs are a big issue.”

“I love Vermont.”

When asked if the practice of moving away for college and the average five year move rate for most Americans has the effect of ripping communities apart, VanGuilder said, “Yes. I think because of the drugs and a lot of the violence that you hear about and read about has a big effect on it. And there not being a lot of jobs. That’s in fact one of the reasons I moved away from Vermont. I found better work in Illinois and then I moved back because I didn’t have as great a support system as I do here. That’s why I came back because of family. I had a career started out there which I was able to advance in. If people really wanted to work they can find it, but a lot of people say, ‘Oh you live in Rutland? Oh isn’t that full of drugs and this and that?’ and some times it is. But if we all work together to make it better then there’s no reason why we can’t clean Rutland up and make this a happy place where people want to come.  It’s not overly huge, but you can get by with what you need. And you have local colleges. You have the community college here. You’ve got Castleton. You’ve got Green Mountain. I mean there’s colleges here. I mean a lot of people just don’t like the town. And that’s unfortunate.”

“I don’t really know much about the politics of Vermont. I have a few family members that are on the PD and some that are sheriffs officers, but I try to keep to my own and if there’s something I can do to fix it then I try but I don’t try to push buttons.”

When asked if elementary school students should learn how to grow their own food, VanGuilder said, “Oh my God yes, please do. My daughter is five years old and that’s all she wants to do. ‘Mommy when do we get to grow tomatoes?’ She calls them amatoes, but she doesn’t like tomatoes, but she knows I do. ‘Mommy I want to grow flowers. I want to grow this vegetable, I want to grow this.’ That is a big thing that I don’t think is taught enough in schools. I mean I had a garden in school in West Rutland. I had one in Salem. And even if it’s flowers or vegetables, there needs to be more hands on, look you need to know how to sew on a button, you need to know how to balance a checkbook. You need to know how to grow food in case God forbid all the stores close down. You need to learn how to grow it. That would be ideal.”

When asked if she thought human instincts are as complex as other animals, VanGuilder said, “No. I think people rely too much on technology nowadays. They’re like, oh well if someone is, I don’t know say God forbid somebody had an artery slashed. What do we do? What do we do? Well, me being in the medical field common sense says apply pressure put a tourniquet on. But others are like…I don’t know. My brother almost lost his hand a few years ago and luckily his instincts were good because we have a lot of nurses in the family. But other people just strike me as I’m sorry to say but stupid. They don’t know enough they rely too much on their phone they’re constantly in their hand are glued to their ear. And I think if people read more and actually thought about certain things then it would be easier to get by on.”

When asked if she thought that emotions were instincts selected by nature for survival, VanGuilder said, “Yes. My brother could very well have died when he lost his hand. I very well could have died had I not been…I’m considered sensitive according to my family. I picked up on the fact that there was a lot of smoke in my house I almost died due to a house fire. My emotions were high because I was stressed earlier that day, but I don’t think people pay enough attention to themselves to think oh maybe I shouldn’t do that.”

When asked if schools should teach students about instincts and teach them to follow their good instincts, VanGuilder said, “Yes. I think that to a certain degree they already do that, but I don’t think it’s enough. I think there needs to be more emphasis on it.”

When asked if she supported legislation that would make it illegal to charge women more than men for similar goods and services, VanGuilder said, “Yeah. If we’re getting the same thing why charge women more? That actually happened to my mother and a few women in the family because they had to have car repair work done. And they made a big to do over it. And I think it’s ridiculous. Just because we’re women doesn’t mean we’re stupid. If we know that we only need our brakes replaced because we can’t do it ourselves, don’t try and con us out of more money and say oh you need this and this and this. No. If we know of something we definitely need done just do as we ask. Unless it’s going to blow up. There’s no reason to charge us more. If we need something done we need it done. It’s ridiculous.”

When asked if she would support legislation that would raise the age you could buy cigarettes in Vermont by a year each year until no one in Vermont was any longer old enough to buy cigarettes, VanGuilder said, “I’m not a smoker. I think that would be ideal, but as to whether or not it would actually go through I doubt. It would definitely make people save more money so they wouldn’t be spending it on cigarettes and Vermont would probably be hands down more healthy. Like I said, it would be ideal.”

When asked who her favorite Vermont band is, VanGuilder said, “I don’t even know if they’re still a group or not anymore but it used to be Thunder Road. They were a local band here in Rutland. They were really good. They were really big on country and some rock. They were my favorite. I don’t know who else there is really.”

When asked if courting rituals are dead or if they are still alive and healthy, VanGuilder said, “With the older generation they are. But say my age, no I don’t think so. I think it’s more let’s see what we can do to show off and see if we can get lucky. But I think if people grew up and thought about it and really wanted to have a deep long lasting relationship they would think back to say their grandparents and how they met and actually take time and effort into the courting side of getting to know someone.”

VanGuilder is on Facebook and she is interested in networking with fellow Vermonters.

When asked if she supported legalizing pot, VanGuilder said, “I don’t do drugs. I know people that do. In terms of say medical marijuana. But with what I’ve recently discovered where I currently live people are being held up in their houses over it. I’m kind of neutral on the pot matter. I don’t mind if you do it, just don’t do it around myself or my kids. Whether or not it is legalized. Sure whatever. I’m not going to be in on it. I don’t do it. I don’t need to. I don’t like it. I mean if it’s for medical purposes yes. Only for medical purposes but you have to have the proper paperwork for it. For it to be legalized for the general population, no.”